Why drink so much water?

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Topic Title: Why drink so much water?
Created On: 05/31/2005 08:26 PM

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 03/14/2017 07:33 PM

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varana

Posts: 281

 The best choice is to fill a reusable water bottle from your sink and you will  benefit from the fluoride in the tap water.



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Varana @ Cook Ortho
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 09/16/2013 03:34 AM

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harry_lloyd

Posts: 101

Water makes your skin fresh and you shine more than before after drinking water regularly with a proper ratio. Doctors are also more concerned with this that all of us should drink water properly to be healthy and fresh. I have visited many dentists as well and they also recommend using water for better dental health. It is not wrong that water is the second most important thing for human after oxygen.Regards,Harry Lloydhttp://www.gurzdental.com
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 05/13/2013 03:22 AM

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StephanieIngram

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water is really good for health....
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 04/14/2013 10:00 AM

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Daniel10Wilson

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The environment that we are in and the activities we do at work just get dehydrated,so require 8 glasses of water a day at the least,it's good for health.integrated baseline reviewearned value management training


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 09/06/2012 08:47 AM

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Hackman88

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Every single day you lose water using your breath, perspiration, urine and bowel motions. For your body to work properly, you must renew its water supply by consuming drinks and foods which contain water.
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 05/31/2012 06:28 AM

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amelyluyanda

Posts: 11

Fluoride helps in developing the structure of the teeth; also it acts as a safety wall and protects the teeth.



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Braces Fairfax VA
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 05/01/2012 02:13 PM

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DrRoyaLevi

Posts: 5

LOST BENEFITS OF TAP WATER
Water fluoridation is endorsed by nearly every major health and safety-related organization in the world. Communities make it a common practice to "fluoridate" their drinking supplies in order for the general population to benefit from this inexpensive and effective preventative treatment. According to the American Dental Association, more than 144 million U.S. residents in more than 10,000 communities drink fluoridated water, most rom public water supplies with sodium fluoride added artificially.

Available studies indicate most bottled water contains fluoride at a level below 0.3 parts per million. Can the consistent use of bottled water result in individuals missing the benefits of optimally fluoridated water? Can home water treatment systems (e.g., water filters) affect optimally fluoridated water supplies? The answer is yes to both. The optimal level of fluoride recommended by the ADA is 0.7-1.2 parts per million (the levels are the same when reported in milligrams of fluoride per liter of water). Majority of bottled water on the market do not contain optimal levels of fluoride. And, some types of home water treatment systems can reduce the fluoride levels in water supplies potentially decreasing the decay-preventive effects of optimally fluoridated water.

To read more about this, go to: http://www.royalevidds.com/blog/post/the-lost-benefits-of-tap-water.html
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 03/31/2012 09:00 AM

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hable2gerber

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Can anyone tell me if floridated water helps prevent tooth decay?
mold removal fort lauderdale

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 08/10/2011 11:06 AM

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ppatel24

Posts: 51

I believe that water is the most healthiest form of liquid. There are drinks that are healthy, but water is the best. This is because it is such an important part of our bodies. Humans were created because of water, and our bodies function normally in watery environments. Since this is a dental website, I want to point out that sodas and other drinks contain sugar and drinking sugar can harm your teeth. For instance, if someone has a cavity and he/she takes in some sugar, his/her teeth will begin to feel pain when the sugar by accidently gets inside the teeth. Sugar also nourishes bacteria, which causes plaque to build up. Sugar in soft drinks also come with other harmful products that makes the tooth enamel to deteriorate. Frequent consumption of soft drinks can also cause the tooth enamel to deteriorate because they contain acids. Therefore, water is important to us, and we should drink so much water so that we don't need sugary drinks to quench our thirsts.
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 07/09/2010 04:34 PM

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AmariT

Posts: 221

Avigneau is right. Recent science just says to drink when you're thirsty, but that doesn't really mean that you should drink soda instead of water. Soda is always going to be less healthy for you than water.

How much water you should drink does also depend on your activity. I used to play a lot of tennis, and my coach taught us to drink a couple of gulps of water every time we switched sides (every two sets). He always said, if you start feeling thirsty, it's already too late.
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 01/28/2010 02:31 PM

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avigneau1

Posts: 37

In my opinion, the whole "eight glasses of water" a day thing is really just an adage that isn't meant to be taken literally. Overall, it's a good thing to keep hydrated and not go for long periods of time feeling thirsty. To me, this is a topic that merits more discussion if clean water were a scarcity rather than a choice.

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 11/05/2009 02:49 PM

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RunnersHigh

Posts: 63

I think drinking water is a very healthy choice, though the occasional soft drink or alcoholic beverage might provide the desired taste we crave for from time to time. But plain water without sugar is definitely healthy for your teeth.
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 09/27/2002 05:27 PM

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22219199

Posts: 55

Folks, I always thought that drinking a lot of water was a health benefit. A recent study seems to indicate otherwise. Please see below. Any comments? Thanks, Frank How much water do we really need to guzzle? Press Trust of India Washington, August 20 "Drink at least eight glasses of water a day" is an adage some obsessively follow, judging by the people sipping on water bottles at every street corner - but the need for so much water may be a myth. Fear that once you're thirsty you're already dehydrated? For many of us, another myth. Caffeinated drinks don't count because they dehydrate? Probably wrong, too. So says a scientist who undertook an exhaustive hunt for evidence backing all this water advice and came up mostly, well, dry. Now the group that sets the nation's nutrition standards is studying the issue, too, to see if it's time to declare a daily fluid level needed for good health - and how much leaves you waterlogged. Until then, "obey your thirst" is good advice, says Dr Heinz Valtin, professor emeritus at Dartmouth Medical School, whose review of the eight-glass theory appears in this month's American Journal of Physiology. It's about time for all the attention, says Pennsylvania State University nutritionist Barbara Rolls, a well-known expert on thirst. "There's so much confusion out there." "There's this conception it can only come out of a bottle," and that's wrong, notes Paula Trumbo of the Institute of Medicine's Food and Nutrition Board, which hopes to decide by March whether to issue the first official water-intake recommendation. In fact, people absorb much water from the food they eat. Fruits and vegetables are 80 to 95 per cent water; meats contain a fair amount; even dry bread and cheese are about 35 per cent water, says Rolls. And many of us drink when we don't really need to, spurred by marketing, salty foods and dry environments, Rolls says. "For most of us, that's not going to matter - you're just going to need to go to the bathroom more," she says. But for people with certain medical conditions, chugging too much can be harmful, sometimes fatal, Valtin warns. Even healthy people - such as teenagers taking the party drug Ecstasy, which induces abnormal thirst - can occasionally drink too much. So-called water intoxication dilutes sodium in the blood until the body can't function properly. Conversely, no one disputes that getting enough water is crucial. Indeed, the elderly often have a diminished sensation of thirst and can become dangerously dehydrated without realising it. People with kidney stones, for example, require lots of water, as does anyone doing strenuous exercise. But the question remains: How much water does the typical, mostly sedentary person truly need? And what's the origin of the theory, heavily promoted by water sellers and various nutrition groups, that the magic number is at least 64 ounces? Valtin, who has spent 40 years researching how the body maintains a healthy fluid balance, determined the advice probably stems from muddled interpretation of a 1945 Food and Nutrition Board report. That report said the body needs about one milliliter of water for each calorie consumed - almost eight cups for a typical 2,000-calorie diet, but that "most of this quantity is contained in prepared foods.
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